Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial intelligence is the ability of a computer to understand what you’re asking and then infer the best possible answer from all the available evidence.

You may think of AI as Siri or Google Now on your iPhone, Jarvis from Iron Man or IBM’s Watson.

From SIRI to self-driving cars, artificial intelligence (AI) is progressing rapidly. While science fiction often portrays AI as robots with human-like characteristics, AI can encompass anything from Google’s search algorithms to IBM’s Watson to autonomous weapons. Artificial intelligence today is properly known as narrow AI (or weak AI), in that it is designed to perform a narrow task (e.g. only facial recognition or only internet searches or only driving a car). However, the long-term goal of many researchers is to create general AI (or strong AI). While narrow AI may outperform humans at whatever its specific task is, like playing chess or solving equations, general AI would outperform humans at nearly every cognitive task.

The ultimate effort is to make computer programs that can solve problems and achieve goals in the world, as well as humans.

There is a scope in developing the machines in game playing, speech recognition machine, language detection machine, computer vision, expert systems, robotics and many more.

Progress of late is furious —an AI R&D arms race is underway among the world’s top technology giants. Soon AI will become the most important human collaboration tool ever created,amplifying our abilities and providing a simple user interface to all exponential technologies. Ultimately, it’s helping us speed toward a world of abundance. A captivating conversation is taking place about the future of artificial intelligence and what it will/should mean for humanity. There are fascinating controversies where the world’s leading experts disagree, such as: AI’s future impact on the job market; if/when human-level AI will be developed; whether this will lead to an intelligence explosion; and whether this is something we should welcome or fear. But there are also many examples of of boring pseudo-controversies caused by people misunderstanding and talking past each other. To help ourselves focus on the interesting controversies and open questions— and not on the misunderstandings — let’s clear up some of the most common myths.